High Rates Of Teacher Turnover

1829 Words Nov 25th, 2016 8 Pages
High rates of teacher turnover has placed huge strains on school districts, moreover, on student performance. It has served to be disruptive to program continuity, staff and student cohesion, and growth and performance, particularly in urban schools. Researchers have long sought to understand why recruiting and retaining quality teachers in urban schools remain a significant challenge (Freedman & Appleman, 2009). According to Ingersoll (2004), with a quarter of the teaching force leaving their classrooms after one year and almost half leaving within five years, teachers in high poverty, urban schools are even more likely to quit. This paper seeks to examine the reasons behind such low proficiency in teacher retention. In this literature review we will examine research on teacher retention in various types of schools and the impact of school climate on teacher retention in order to shed some light upon the issues faced in low performing urban schools such as Park Elementary.
Characteristics of Schools Most Likely To Maintain Teacher Retention
High Poverty Schools Nationally, teacher turnover is 50 percent higher in high poverty schools than in more affluent schools (Allen, 2005). He indicated that 20 percent of teachers in high poverty schools have three or less years of teaching experience, compared with 11 percent in low poverty schools. Hanushek, Kain, and Rivkin (2004) discovered that Texas teachers tended to move from high to lower poverty schools. It was discovered…
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