How Education Is The Key Focus On Improving Test Scores

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For many years the government has played a role in how education was run. For decades, politics has placed its focus on student test scores, how to increase those test scores, and standards that must be followed in order to achieve the goals the politicians have set. Early childhood education has been the key focus on improving test scores. According to the politics, test scores must meet above average levels in order for students to become college and career ready. Greater emphasize is pushed on math and reading levels to improve before students reach middle grade classes. Politics took more control and are now pressing for state standardized test to prove student improvements and well as school improvement. The government has…show more content…
Developed in 2001 but signed by President Bush in 2002, the NCLB was designed to include all children the right to the same education, including those with disabilities (Educational Technology, 2012). It was designed to provide parents more options and better teaching methods for their children with disabilities (Educational Technology, 2012). It described how and what students would be learning and assessments given to prove their success. The NCLB was designed with academic standards categorized by each individual state. By the 2005 school year, all states were to prove their assessments for language arts and math in grades 3-8 every year, then once during their high school years. By the 2007 school year, science assessments became mandatory. Although the NCLB were designed to include children with disabilities, they were still expected to partake in the assessments, even if it meant providing accommodations for them. Some accommodations could include students with disabilities receiving extra time on test, having a small group management, having test questions read aloud to them or allowing them to take extra breaks during the test (No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB): An Overview, 2014). Since all schools were to prove a 100 percent annual measurable objective by the end of the 2013 school year, most states had to apply for a waiver to change their passing rates from 100 percent to a more realistic goal. Schools argued that the goals for all
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