How Night by Elie Wiesel Helped People Connect to the Horrors of the Holocaust

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Words, the written language, a way to express feelings, emotions, experiences, and all that your mind can recall from life or fantasy. Although many have heard of the terrors faced by the Jews in countries that were under German control during World War II, few have stepped back and really thought about the weight of what really happened to the people in the concentration camps. I believe Night helped people connect to what really happened. This is an actual person's life, their story, poured out onto pages that reflect not only facts but his deepest pains and fears. While recounting his physical discomforts and many hardships, he also gives a viewpoint for our imaginations. The best way I have been introduced to how it would even remotely…show more content…
This level of rich memory relates the reader to the experience, making it easier for that person to remember the events being explained. As once said by George Santayana, "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." With all the people who endured this first hand gone, it is a rare and wondrous thing to behold an entire story from beginning to end by someone who lived it first hand. Of course, the story not only tells us about Elie's tragedies, but also his people as a whole, as well as, giving other short stories of how the calamity affected other individuals around him. Such as, on page 103, when he is talking about the collective death cry on the wagons, "Someone had just died. Others, close to death, imitated his cry. And their cries seemed to come from beyond the grave....The death rattle of an entire convoy with the end approaching." Such a dark and gruesome depiction of a wave of death sweeping over so many people around him. This vivid description as well as many others help bring to light the diverse stories going on. Elie was definitely not the only one being exposed to the contention. There were so many besides him that suffered. This is one way, I believe, that the author meant to cite that. Another reason this account of Elie's memories is to see the differences and similarities between various stories told by many people is to have a

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