Impact Of Grief In Childhood. Although The Phenomenon Of

1197 Words5 Pages
Impact of Grief in Childhood Although the phenomenon of grief is a normal, healthy response to the death of someone loved, for children it is a traumatic ripping away of everything they have known. As a result, everyday life becomes utter chaos while familiarity and comfort vanish, emotionally propelling the griever into uncharted territory with innumerable questions and fears. When those uncertainties are not dealt with appropriately, grieving children tend to imagine circumstances that may be far worse than reality” (Pond, 2013, p. 113).
While most children learn to cope with their grief, losing a parent or sibling within their family often results in young people manifesting issues with their mental health, which can be evidenced in
…show more content…
396). Adolescents and some pre-adolescents see the future through negative lenses and can become disinterested in setting future goals. Often risky behavior and suicidal thoughts will be seen, as any reasoning for this loss is clouded within their grief.
Potential Treatment Protocols for Grief in Childhood According to Pond (2012), the grief process in young people is dependent on both emotional and cognitive developmental levels of each child, as well as the environmental changes that might occur due to this loss. Pond (2013) explains that Freud was among the first to acknowledge the need for processing grief, which he saw as the path to regaining emotional equilibrium being possible only through disconnecting emotionally from the dead loved one. Upon further research, Bowlby changed this line of thinking; and with children, attachment with the dead loved one was adapted to change the type of relationship the child experiences with a consideration of the past, present, and future being different due to the death. Based on these findings, treatment protocols have been developed to assist children who are experiencing trouble processing grief.
Psychoeducation
Young people do receive a
Get Access