Implications Of A Utopia As A Utopial Or Perfect Society

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The term utopia is often coined as an ideal or perfect society. In Sir Thomas More “Utopia” such a society is presented. However, today’s reader can see that this ideal or perfect society is filled with many underlying problems that make it not utopic or even dystopic. To exemplify the society More’s mention puts a strain on the freedom and relationship the citizens have with its country in to question. Such an act is detrimental in creating a utopia because if the citizens are not happy with the freedom and rights they are given how can the society itself be presented as a utopia, it is instead like a prison.
Freedom is the ability for any individual to express their opinions or belief. It is a necessary component needed in a Utopia, but must also be restrained to a certain sense because if not it would lead to anarchy. However, more society restrains the personal freedom of its citizen to an unnecessary extent that is detrimental to an ideal society. To demonstrate Utopians need a passport in order to leave their city, and if they are caught trying to leave the city without one they are “punished as a fugitive[s], and sent home disgracefully” (41) This causes Utopian’s to feel that they are trapped in a prison, such a feeling is the exact opposite of a Utopia. A Utopia should make a person feel they have strong sense of freedom and ability to express him or herself. However, More Utopia does not give people this sense of freedom. Instead, More Utopia makes people feel

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