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Is There a Correlation between with STEM and Non-STEM Areas of Study

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The analysis of the data begins by observing whether or not there is a correlation with STEM and non-STEM areas of study to men and women. If there is a correlation of STEM and non-STEM areas of study to men and women then one can accurately predict the academic outcome of people with degrees in STEM and non-STEM. This is done by observing how many men and women who have majors in natural sciences and social sciences/humanities and if there is a tendency of a gender choosing a particular major within a certain field. In Table 1 a Chi-Square test of independence was performed to determine whether the majors in natural sciences and social sciences/humanities were equally preferred. Preference for the two areas of study were not equally…show more content…
However, these percentages do not accurately determine whether or not that person would have a degree from a STEM field. According to Ma (2011, p. 1180), “43 percent of women who initially claimed a major in STEM ultimately attained their degree, compared with 38 percent of men who did so.” Despite 20.9% more men studying in the areas of natural sciences than women, 5% more women graduate in STEM fields than men. 50.5% of men and 71.4% of women are studying in the areas of social sciences/humanities which are considered non-STEM degrees. According to Ma’s (2011, p. 1181) figure 2 b. roughly 20% of women and 10% of men graduate with non-STEM degrees. The correlation of men and women that study in social sciences/humanities or non-STEM areas of study are similar to the men and women that have degrees in social sciences/ humanities or non-STEM area of study. The correlation is that there are more women than men that study and graduate in social sciences/ humanities or non-STEM areas of study. The original hypothesis was if there is a correlation of STEM and non-STEM areas of study to men and women then one can accurately predict the academic outcome of people with degrees in STEM and non-STEM. However, Ma’s (2011, p. 1181) figure 2 b. showed evidence that a larger percentage women obtained degrees in natural sciences than men did. This is controversial
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