Jay Gatsby´s Outlook on Life in F. Scott Fitzgerald´s The Great Gatsby

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With regards to human nature during the Jazz Age during which he wrote, F. Scott Fitzgerald, author of The Great Gatsby, would most likely agree with the general philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau on human psychology. In a nutshell, the view of Rousseau was simply that man is naturally pure and free, only to be corrupted by society and the outside world. In connecting Fitzgerald’s use of appropriate color symbolism to the two parts of Rousseau’s view, we can see how he (Fitzgerald) is describing the nature of man in general terms through the story of Jay Gatsby. The colors mainly associated with Jay Gatsby throughout the course of the book are white, yellow, and blue, which, in order, represent the progression of his mental state and his …show more content…
With regards to human nature during the Jazz Age during which he wrote, F. Scott Fitzgerald, author of The Great Gatsby, would most likely agree with the general philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau on human psychology. In a nutshell, the view of Rousseau was simply that man is naturally pure and free, only to be corrupted by society and the outside world. In connecting Fitzgerald’s use of appropriate color symbolism to the two parts of Rousseau’s view, we can see how he (Fitzgerald) is describing the nature of man in general terms through the story of Jay Gatsby. The colors mainly associated with Jay Gatsby throughout the course of the book are white, yellow, and blue, which, in order, represent the progression of his mental state and his outlook on life. One of the focal points in The Great Gatsby is the characterization of Daisy as pure and innocent, and also as Gatsby’s goal in the book. When Nick, the narrator, goes to meet Daisy and her friend Jordan Baker early in the book, he makes note of the amount of white surrounding Daisy. In describing Daisy and Jordan, Nick says “They were both in white” (Fitzgerald 13) He even makes note of the minute things around Daisy, like the windows in her house, which were “ajar and gleaming white” as well (Fitzgerald 13). Much later, Gatsby himself refers to her as the one who lives "high in a white palace, the king's daughter, the golden girl", meaning that she is surrounded in purity (Fitzgerald 115). Despite taking any of the

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