John F. Kennedy 's Civil Rights Address

1032 WordsMay 3, 20175 Pages
John F. Kennedy was the 35th president of the United States. He was in office from January 20, 1 to November 22, 1963. When he was assassinated. He fought for protecting the rights of all who wish to be free. Kennedy gave a speech called “Civil Rights Address” in June of 1963. He Spoke about dealing with equal opportunity and inequality in the United states calling it a moral crisis. Kennedy states, “I am, therefore, asking the Congress to enact legislation giving all Americans the right to be served in facilities which are open to the public -- hotels, restaurants, theaters, retail stores, and similar establishments. This seems to me to be an elementary right. Its denial is an arbitrary indignity that no American in 1963 should have to…show more content…
Dyson proves his point while comparing an African American by the name of Jeremiah Wright to a few of past presidents. In the chapter Re-Founding Father in “The Black Presidency”, Dyson recalls a political fundraiser for Barak Obama hosted by Oprah Winfrey during his run for president. He states that a lot of celebrities were in attendance such as Stevie Wonder, Sidney Poitier and Chris Rock. He remembers everyone being social amongst each other. Dyson, Obama and Rock engaged in a conversation. Chris rock compared Obamas campaign to a heavyweight fight between Larry Holmes and Gerry Cooney (119). Holmes was black and Cooney was white. The moral of Rock’s story was that Holmes had beat Cooney so bad that they had to stop the fight. If it wasn’t for the knockout Cooney would have won from the score cards because he was white. Chris rock used the fight as a metaphor for “the black experience”. Dyson states, “By then Obama and I were nodding our heads in agreement. We knew the odds were often stacked against blacks in the competition to get a decent shot at a job or a seat in school” (119). Dyson Obama and Rock knew as African American men they had to fight for equal opportunity. Dyson Believes that inequality of African Americans in this country is important, yet unfair. In the article “The Scold of Black Folk” Dysons makes good claims that inequality in this
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