Kubla Kahn by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

759 Words3 Pages
Kubla Kahn There are likely many themes that are worth mentioning in “Kubla Khan”. Some of the things are complementary to each other, while others, such as creation and destruction, are opposites, yet are often found together. Many of the themes are positive while others are negative. There is a sense of mystery that pervades the poem, such that the meaning is largely left up to interpretation. “Kubla Khan” tells a story, yet it also seems to be trying to make a point. Some of the more noticeable themes in this poem are creation, destruction, and imagination. Psychological interpretations of the poem reveal a strong sexual undertone (Heninger, 358). This, of course, contributes to the theme of creation. The poem goes, “And here were forests ancient as the hills”, referring to forests that were present during the creation of the world. “By woman wailing for her demon-lover!” This torrid line seems to suggest the strong sexual undertones mentioned earlier. And, of course, where there is sexual references there is often the prospect, at least, of creation. “Could I revive within me Her symphony and song”. This question seeks to determine whether the song could be sung in the manner. The song is dead, but needs to be recreated with me, the voice of the poem. “I would build that dome in air”, the building of the structure of course entails its creation. From some sort of material the dome represents a transformation from rawness to a fully-formed dome, standing on its own.

More about Kubla Kahn by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Get Access