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Light & Shade: An Exegetical Brief of Psalms 27

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Light & Shade: An Exegetical Brief of
Psalms 27

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“Light and Salvation”: An Exegetical Brief of Psalm
27
A. An outline and Structural Analysis!
- Enemies and the Fear of the Lord (v1-3)!
- The Psalmist’s One Petition (v4-6)!
- Distress, but resolved to wait on Jehovah (v7-12)!
- Reassurance (v13-14)!

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B. Introduction !
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The book of Psalms consists of one hundred fifty songs and prayers in the

Wisdom literature section of the Bible. The identification of some psalms as prayers is also seen within the text, for example in the conclusion to Psalm 72, "The prayers of
David son of Jesse are ended." They each have a poetic character with frequent use of
parallelism.
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II. The Psalmist’s one petition!
In verses four through six we see the one petition of the Psalmist “That I may dwell

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in the house of Jehovah all the days of my life.”9 Here, the psalmist asks to be allowed to

dwell, to continue in the holy city, first, that he may continue to worship in the Temple and secondly that he may be able to inquire; the hebrew word bakkēr meaning to inquire, insinuates he would like to be able to inquire of God for direction in times of difficulty.10 In verse five “For in the day of trouble he shall keep me secretly in his pavilion”11 we

encounter the hebrew word rā 'āh meaning “trouble or evil” followed by the phrase he shall keep me secretly, bringing the thoughts of God keeping something of very high value safe both interconnected with in his pavilion better translated within is fence, a fence made of thorns. We can make a connection with a fence of thorns with a
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W.E. Barnes The Psalms 135-139 (London: Methuen, 1931)

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Psalm 27:4

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John H. Walton, Zondervan Illustrated Bible Backgrounds Commentary 343. (Michigan: Zondervan, 2009.)

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Psalm 27:5

reference to a shepherd would erect a sukkah, (hebrew word meaning defense or screen) several feet high
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