Mary Catherine Bateson's Improvisation In a Persian Garden, Annie Dillard's Seeing and Leslie Marmon Silko's Landscape, History, and the Pueblo Imagi

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Mary Catherine Bateson's Improvisation In a Persian Garden, Annie Dillard's Seeing and Leslie Marmon Silko's Landscape, History, and the Pueblo Imagination

This paper will analyze Improvisation In a Persian Garden (Mary Catherine Bateson), Seeing (Annie Dillard), and Landscape, History, and the Pueblo Imagination (Leslie Marmon Silko). Going through the Purpose, audience, context, ethics, and stance of each author’s piece.

All three stories show the reader what each author sees. All three authors write of an event that took place in their individual lives. Both Dillard and Bateson go back and forth between the past and the present, while Silko talks of events that took place only in the past.

In Seeing, Annie Dillard writes
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(Bateson pg.7) Bateson’s whole point is that parents do not always understand what the see. Even when explaining what they see to a child. Landscape, History, and the Pueblo Imagination is different than the first two stories. Although Silko is describing what she sees, Silko is also describing what other people are seeing. Silko describes people as part of the land and not just people.“Viewers are as much a part of the landscape as the boulders they stand on”. (Silko pg.92) Silko is saying that landscape is everything seen, not just selected items.

Bateson’s purpose is to show how we see things and how we educate children to adult meanings.” I had slipped into a teaching role.” (Bateson Pg.7) Bateson is implying that a child must be taught what they see and not experience it. Bateson goes on to say that when children are explained what they see, they will understand and not fear what they see.

Dillard wants people to pay attention not to what they see, but to what they do not see “unless I call my attention to what passes before my eyes, I simply won’t see it.” (Dillard pg.21) Dillard is pointing out what needs to be seen, those things that we have chosen not to see. Dillard is writing of the things she saw and learned as a child. Silko wants to educate people, on the difference between reading a story in a book and hearing someone telling that same story. “Oral narrative became the medium in which the complexes of Pueblo

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