Mary Oliver And Walt Whitman's View Of Nature

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Nature in the dictionary of Cambridge is the animals, plants, rocks, etc. in the world and all the features, forces, and processes that happen or exist independently of people, such as the weather, the sea, mountains, the production of young animals or plants, and growth. Many poets and philosophers have discussed the essence of nature. Both Mary Oliver and Walt Whitman emphasize this essence; for Mary explains why everything in nature has a soul and Walt explains why animals have a better life than we do.
Mary Oliver emphasizes in her poetry the relation between nature and herself (as a woman). She believes that this connection is due to her strong belief that everything in nature has a soul and is alive. She believes that nature and humans
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Whitman’s view of animals is a result of his dissatisfaction with the lifestyle of humans. My opinion is that the author is trying to employ the tranquility that comes with being one with nature. We have a habit of to making things more difficult than required, whereas the simplicity of animals brings about a certain sensation of relaxation. Animals do not seem worry about the world. They tend to go about their day as nature intended. Our life’s will never be freed from human interference and “law”. Unlike animals, we live in a civilization where people’s opinions, social norms and statuses control us. Discrimination, stereotype, social status has overpowered human’s freedom today and has tortured those who are weaker. So, Whitman wanted to undermine the distinction between the two. We observe that the author uses a lot of repetition which are two verbs “I think “&” I stand”, three times “They do not” and “Not one”. These recurrence gives sense of author’s meaning, more memorable. This means that he by repetition he is insisting and emphasize something. He lists his ideas without any hierarchal organization. This shows that he doesn’t have the traditional style of writing a poem, which involves

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