Metz Film Language a Semiotics of the Cinema PDF

100902 Words316 Pages
FILM LANGUAGE

FILM
LANGUAGE
A Semiotics of the Cinema

Christian Metz
Translated by Michael Taylor

The University of Chicago Press

Published by arrangement with Oxford University Press, Inc.
The University of Chicago Press, Chicago 60637
© 1974 by Oxford University Press, Inc.
All rights reserved. English translation. Originally published 1974
Note on Translation © 1991 by the University of Chicago
University of Chicago Press edition 1991
Printed in the United States of America

09 08 07

6 7 8 9 10

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

Metz, Christian.
[Essais sur la signification au cinéma. English]
Film language: a semiotics of the cinema / Christian Metz: translated by Michael Taylor.
p. cm.
Translation of: Essais
…show more content…
The term constantif, which Metz borrowed from Austin, should be rendered by "constantive" and not by "ascertaining"
(p. 25). Finally, "actor" to translate Greimas 's concept of actant is misleading and actant is usually kept (see Ducrôt and Todorov, Encyclopedic
Dictionary of the Sciences of Language, Johns Hopkins University Press,
1979, p. 224), and discours image when translated as "image discourse" is not very clear, since it is referring to film, which is made up of images.
The following rough spots occur only once each: "Unusual" (p. 5) translates weakly insolite, which has also the connotation of strange, disquieting, surprising, unexpected, and uncanny. A "slice of cinema" (p.14) would be preferable to a "piece of cinema." "Narrative agency" rather than "instance"; "de-realization"or "de-realizing" rather than "unrealizing."
"A seminal concept" (p. 58) doesn 't really render une notion gigogne
(again the idea of embedded concepts). The title of Lang 's film which is translated by The Damned is actually M. "Signifying statements" should be "semenes" (p. 26). I have not found an English equivalent for mise en grilles, which refers to a gridlike breakdown of linguistic units and which Taylor translates by "pigeon-holing"

    More about Metz Film Language a Semiotics of the Cinema PDF

      Get Access