Monroe Doctrine And The United States

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James Monroe, born on April 28, 1758, in Westmoreland County, Virginia. Monroe was educated at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. In 1776, he joined the Continental Army and fought in the American Revolutionary War. In 1782, Monroe began his career in politics as a delegate in the Virginia Assembly only to later be elected as a representative of the Congress. In 1816, Monroe was elected as the fifth President of the United States. During this time he played a significant role in the westward expansion of the United States. In 1820, Monroe was elected for a second Presidential term; however Monroe became more active in dealing with the U.S. foreign policy. On December 2, 1823, Monroe addressed congress with a…show more content…
Throughout the document, Monroe directly says “In the wars of European powers in matters relating to themselves, we have never taken any part, nor does it comport with our policy to do so” meaning the U.S. will not partake or interfere with any European fight. However, this does not mean we will not defend ourselves or our neighbors if European powers made efforts to rule land within our areas of interest. Monroe relayed this important and powerful statement as “…to the defense of our own, which has been achieved by the loss of so much blood and treasure, and matured by the wisdom of their most enlightened citizens…this whole nation is devoted.” The issue of any potential attempt to colonize within our hemisphere would have been seen as a threat, which the U.S. would react to as such in the defense of our republic. On the other hand, Monroe did state he would not interfere with any European colonies that were already in existence within the Americans, but they could not continue expansion.
More importantly, Monroe puts emphasis on the fact that there are countries within both Central and South
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