Montaigne in The Return of Martin Guerra by Natalie Zemon Davis

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In “The Return of Martin Guerre,” Natalie Zemon Davis portrays Jean de Coras as a knowledgeable, impartial judge, fully capable of recognizing female intelligence and of looking beyond the status quo in his pursuit of truth. Like any judge, Coras has the discretion to select or omit certain pieces of evidence, the power to shape the official and accepted version of the truth; however, Michel de Montaigne would argue that Coras has a high probability of reaching a distorted verdict. Montaigne’s “Essays” claims that knowledge is acquired through the process of self-questioning, but this self-questioning presumes that knowledge begins with ones own perspectives and not with disciplines (such as a medicine and law), which are bound to …show more content…
In “The Return of Martin Guerre,” Natalie Zemon Davis portrays Jean de Coras as a knowledgeable, impartial judge, fully capable of recognizing female intelligence and of looking beyond the status quo in his pursuit of truth. Like any judge, Coras has the discretion to select or omit certain pieces of evidence, the power to shape the official and accepted version of the truth; however, Michel de Montaigne would argue that Coras has a high probability of reaching a distorted verdict. Montaigne’s “Essays” claims that knowledge is acquired through the process of self-questioning, but this self-questioning presumes that knowledge begins with ones own perspectives and not with disciplines (such as a medicine and law), which are bound to theoretical suppositions and logical formal systems. Montaigne's real concern is not with Coras’s disciplinary knowledge, but the relationship between different human beings and the conventions by which their experience is defined and identity contained.
Throughout “Essays,” Montaigne sprinkles implicative and digressive examples to claim that knowledge can only be found in a composite human being—made of independent thoughts and experiences. EXPLATORY
Of Cannibals Montagines’s “Of Cannibals” investigates not cannibalism nor the noble savages, but rather the nature, methodology, and power of reason. It is in this context that Montaigne examines the use of reason in making judgments. This is exemplified when Monatagine states, “we are to
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