Narrative techniques of Charles Dickens in Oliver Twist and David Copperfield

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FACULTY OF PHILOLOGY
THE DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

Diploma thesis

Charles Dickens’s “Oliver Twist” and “David Copperfield”: Two novels compared (Narrative techniques)

Mentor: Student:
Dr. Muhamet Hamiti Arbnesha Kusari

Table of Contents

1. Introduction………………………………………………………………3
2. Biography of Charles Dickens….………………………………..……....4
3. Oliver Twist……………………………………………………………….5
3.1. Plot of the
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The work was well-received, but its reception was nothing compared to the international acclaim he received with the publication of The Pickwick Papers in the following year. 6
After this early blush of success, Dickens took on the job as editor of Bentley’s Miscellany, a literary magazine in which a number of his early works were serialized, including Oliver Twist (1837-9) and Nicholas Nickleby (1838-9). He left to begin his own literary magazine, Master Humphrey’s Clock, in 1840, and over the next ten years published many of his most famous novels in serial form, including The Old Curiosity Shop (1840-1), A Christmas Carol (1844), and David Copperfield (1849-50), perhaps the most autobiographical of all his novels.
He made his first visit of USA in 1842. He had taken trips in other places like France, Italy and Switzerland but always returning to his home. His journeys abroad influenced him a lot in his work. Other works were serialized in Household Words between 1850 and 1859, which was then succeeded by All the Year Round, which he edited until his death in 1870, publishing such novels as A Tale of Two Cities (1859), Great Expectations (1860-1), and Our Mutual Friend (1864-5). A workaholic to the end, Dickens died of a stroke in 1870 after having penned a chapter of The Mystery of Edwin Drood, his final (and unfinished) novel, the previous day.7
Although Dickens is distinguished for his

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