Of God and Nature

940 Words Dec 3rd, 2015 4 Pages
Gloria Omole

1. There are two books that give me my divine stance: the one God wrote himself (scripture) and the alternative for those who don’t seek the bible (nature). Those who have not seen his teachings firsthand know of him through his scripture. 2. The sun caused the ones that know him through scripture to appreciate him; it was a miracle that was to be taken note of above all his other miracles 3. The pagans knew how to read the word better than Christians themselves, although they read less into it then those with faith do. 4. I do not forget to give God credit for nature, which is not the foundation of motion and rest, but the normal pace of mankind. 5. Every new day is marked by the revolution of the sun
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This simile puts the position of God into perspective, as a master Creator. | “…For God is like a skillful geometrician, who, when more easily and with one stroke of his compass he might describe or divide a right line, has yet rather do this in a circle or longer way, according to the constituted and fore-laid principles of his art” | Imagery | The author develops an image of a elder, meticulously constructing a plan to create something beautiful. I | “I cannot tell by what logic we call a toad, a bear, or an elephant ugly; they being created in those outward shapes and figures which beat express the actions of their of inward forms, and having passed that general visitation of God…” | Tone | The concept in which things that are seemingly deformed or aesthetically challenging is “ugly” should be considered absurd, since everything made on the planet, and everything God created is beautiful. The tone is one of admonition, since the author believes it is illogical to call something “ugly” if it was created by God | “Thus there are two books from whence I collect divinity; besides that one written by God, another of his servant nature, that universal and public manuscript that lies expansed unto the eyes of all…” | Syntax | By mentioning the
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