Pilipinong Manunulat

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10. Carlo J. Caparas is a comic strip creator, writer, director and producer who became sensational known for his created local superheroes and comic book characters that are still popular to Filipinos until now. Some of his creations turned Filipino icons such as “Panday” (a Blacksmith hero) and many others. As a producer and director, Carlo J. Caparas produced box-office movies based on comics and true-to-life stories and crimes. In 2009 he received National Artist Award granted by the President of the Philippines. 9. Mars Ravelo is also a comic strip creator and writer who became phenomenal in the Philippines for his created superheroes such as “Darna” (a Filipino version of Wonder Woman), Dyesabel (name of the Filipino…show more content…
His journalism was markedly both intellectual and provocative, an unknown genre in the Philippines at that time, raising the level of reportage in the country. Joaquín deeply admired José Rizal, the national hero of the Philippines. Joaquín paid tribute to Rizal by way of books such as The Storyteller’s New Medium – Rizal in Saga, The Complete Poems and Plays of Jose Rizal, and A Question of Heroes: Essays in Criticism on Ten Key Figures of Philippine History. He also translated the hero’s valedictory poem, in the original Spanish “Mi Ultimo Adios,” as “Land That I Love, Farewell!” Joaquín served as a member of Motion Pictures under President Diosdado Macapagal and President Ferdinand E. Marcos. Joaquin’s first move as National Artist was to secure the release of imprisoned writer José F. Lacaba. Later, at a ceremony on Mount Makiling attended by First Lady Imelda Marcos, Joaquín delivered an invocation to Mariang Makiling, the mountain’s mythical maiden. Joaquín touched on the importance of freedom and the artist. As a result, for the remainder of the Marcos regime, Joaquín no longer received invitations to address important cultural events. 5. Lualhati Bautista is one of the foremost Filipino female novelists in the history of contemporary Philippine Literature. Her novels include, “Dekada ’70 (Decade ’70)”, “Bata, Bata, Pa’no Ka Ginawa? (Child, Child… How were you made?”, and “‘GAPÔ (short name for Olongapo,

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