Post Traumatic Stress Disorder ( Ptsd )

946 WordsJan 25, 20164 Pages
Getting a service dog is not as easy as going to the pet store and picking out the puppy who stares into the soul and says “pick me.” For the most part, service dogs require tedious training anywhere from twelve to twenty four months and are costly according to the training and trainer. Depending on the service needed, tasks of service dogs vary from retrieving items, turning off lights, and opening doors for a disabled person to detecting seizures to relieving a person suffering with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Captain Luis Montalvan tells his account of his service dog, Tuesday, that helps him face a society with visible and invisible disabilities and overcoming discrimination with the help of federal laws in his book Until Tuesday. As a war veteran from two tours, Captain Montalvan suffered from significant PTSD as well as physical problems. Before he received Tuesday from the service dog training facility, ECAD, Captain Montalvan rarely went anywhere outside his New York City apartment or socialized. When he got Tuesday, the service dog was able to act as a barrier for the physically and mentally disabled soldier. Tuesday gave him the confidence to face to bustling subway and crowded sidewalks with only minor issues and eventually graduate from Columbia University. Like Captain Montalvan and Tuesday, service dogs do not erase all of their handler’s issues and handicaps, however, they significantly improve their quality of life. Obviously, someone who is in a
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