Premarital Sex Reflection

2243 Words Sep 20th, 2011 9 Pages
Premarital Sex
The Issue of Premarital Sex
Premarital sex seems to be a black and white issue. Someone either participates or they don’t, but when looking deeper into the ethical issues of premarital sex the issue becomes very gray. Some would say premarital sex is someone’s right to their personal sexual happiness, but others would say it is a byproduct of other factors in one life. Relationships and marriage should be based on a mutual love, but when premarital sex is involved there is the issue of lust. Does this person someone is about to marry love them for who they are or love them for what they are? Some argue people who engage in premarital sexual activities turn their partner into a sex object meaning they treat their partner like
…show more content…
“The sole condition on which we are free to make use of our sexual desires depends on the right to dispose over the person as a whole.” (Kant 717) What Kant means by this is marriage.
If I have the right over the whole person, I have also right over the part, and so I have the right to use that person’s sexual organs for the satisfaction of sexual desire. But how am I to obtain these rights over the whole person? Only by giving that person the same right over the whole of myself. This happens only in marriage” (717).
Such love should only be expressed in monogamous relationships between man and wife. He argues this sex is more rewarding than any anyone had when trying to feed their sexual appetites. “Thus sexuality leads to a union of human beings, and in that union alone its exercise is permissible.” (Kant 718).

A Right to Sexual Happiness In society people are constantly seeking satisfaction with life. Sometimes however what people think make them happy only make them happy because society says it should make them happy. People are taught they have a right to happiness; that is should simply occur in their life because they are alive. A right many people think they have is a right to sexual happiness. C.S. Lewis said, “A right to happiness doesn’t, for me, make much more sense than a right to be six feet tall, or to…