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Essay on Search for Perfection in Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye

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Search for a Perfection in The Bluest Eye

The concept of physical beauty and desire to conform to a prescribed definition of what is considered beautiful can destroy a person's life. In Toni Morrison's novel, The Bluest Eye, many characters are obsessed with attaining the idealist definition of what is considered beautiful. The characters of Geraldine, Pauline, and Pecola all believe that physical perfection leads to acceptance; however, it is the same belief that causes their personal downfalls and prevents them from recognizing their own inner beauty.

Geraldine's anxieties over wanting to comply with what others think is beautiful, damage her existence. For example, the character of Geraldine is so consumed with physical
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She thinks his appearance is more important than her affection because she also wants to have a family that looks white. Geraldine thinks brushing her son's hair and oiling his skin will help to make his black features vanish. Geraldine's concern and obsession over what is regarded by others as beautiful demolish her life.

The character of Pauline tries so desperately to fit into society's typecast of beauty that she loses the ability to love herself for who she is as well as her ability to appreciate what she does have. For example, when Pauline is made to feel inferior by other black women, Morrison emphasizes, "Pauline felt uncomfortable with the few black women she met. They were amused by her because she didn't straighten her hair. When she tried to make up her face as they did, it came off rather badly. Their goading glances and private snickers at her way of talking... and dressing developed in her desire for new clothes" (Morrison 118). Pauline is aggravated because of her physical appearance. She feels ugly and wants to fit in with society's women. She tries fitting into what is thought by those around her to be the ideal characterization of beauty instead of accepting herself for whom she is. Pauline Breedlove's insecurities only deepen as a result of her attempts to look a certain way. In addition, when Morrison explains how Pauline would rather be around nice things at work than at her own
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