Shakespeare's Romeo and Juiliet Shows the Forcefulness of Love and Fate

759 Words 4 Pages
“Two households, both alike in dignity, In fair Verona, where we lay our scene, From ancient grudge break to new mutiny, Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean. From forth the fatal loins of these two foes A pair of star-cross'd lovers take their life; Whose misadventured piteous overthrows Do with their death bury their parents' strife. The fearful passage of their death-mark'd love, And the continuance of their parents' rage, Which, but their children's end, nought could remove, Is now the two hours' traffic of our stage; The which if you with patient ears attend, What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend.” The “star-cross’d lovers” spoken of in the monologue of Romeo and Juliet, are, of course, Romeo Montague and Juliet …show more content…
“Two households, both alike in dignity, In fair Verona, where we lay our scene, From ancient grudge break to new mutiny, Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean. From forth the fatal loins of these two foes A pair of star-cross'd lovers take their life; Whose misadventured piteous overthrows Do with their death bury their parents' strife. The fearful passage of their death-mark'd love, And the continuance of their parents' rage, Which, but their children's end, nought could remove, Is now the two hours' traffic of our stage; The which if you with patient ears attend, What here shall miss, our toil shall strive to mend.” The “star-cross’d lovers” spoken of in the monologue of Romeo and Juliet, are, of course, Romeo Montague and Juliet Capulet. It is fate which seems to bring these two lovers from rival families together. The eventually fatal attraction between these two lovers contributes strongly to Shakespeare’s overall theme of love. The strong connection between Romeo and Juliet help to show the forcefulness of both love and fate.
Romeo and Juliet’s relationship is very strong. It is fate that brings them together, or so Shakespeare portrays by showing that the characters believe this is true. When Romeo shouts “Is it even so? Then I defy you stars!” (Act 5, Scene 1) he is referring to fate and saying that he is in opposition to the destiny of him and Juliet’s relationship. The love between Romeo and Juliet is young, irrational and passionate. Lustful love, which is