Should Electronic Cigarettes Be Banned?

911 WordsFeb 12, 20164 Pages
BACKGROUND While the rate of traditional cigarette smoking in the United States, including California, has decreased, the rates of electronic cigarette smoking, known as vaping, has drastically increased. In 2013 2.6 percent of all Americans used electronic cigarettes, including 3.5 percent of all Californians. While the 2015 statistic for California has not been released, nationwide that number has jumped to 10 percent1. Electronic cigarettes are often marketed as a safe alternative to traditional cigarettes that releases water vapor as opposed to dangerous chemicals found in traditional cigarettes. However, more and more data is suggesting that while electronic cigarettes do not release as many harmful chemicals as traditional cigarettes, they do release, via exposure to secondhand “vapor”, chemicals and harmful metals at rates that are harmful for humans. Currently, electronic cigarette vaping is not regulated by state law as traditional smoking is. To date, nine counties and 64 cities and towns in California have banned vaping to some degree – either in bars, restaurants, enclosed workplaces, or a combination of the three. In all other jurisdictions, vaping is permitted. No jurisdictions have banned vaping around entryways and windows of buildings or in vehicles when children are present1. ISSUE Electronic cigarette vaping has shown to release harmful chemicals and metals into the air via secondhand vapor, which is, in fact, aerosol and not vapor. However, the State of
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