Social Classes in Revolutional France in Les Miserable by Victor Hugo

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Les Miserables by Victor Hugo demonstrates the prevalence of social classes in revolutionary France. The protagonist Jean Valjean experiences numerous social injustices throughout his life but learns many valuable lessons in the process, which help Valjean become a better person and learn that being honest is very important. He learns that he cannot run away from the past but rather he should learn from it so he can lead a better life. The book starts off with Valjean in a jail cell, and then he escapes. This is where he learns about the importance of honesty. Later on in the book Valjean becomes a father to Cosette he learns the importance of love and family. He realizes how much Cosette means to him and that he would do anything to…show more content…
Les Miserables by Victor Hugo demonstrates the prevalence of social classes in revolutionary France. The protagonist Jean Valjean experiences numerous social injustices throughout his life but learns many valuable lessons in the process, which help Valjean become a better person and learn that being honest is very important. He learns that he cannot run away from the past but rather he should learn from it so he can lead a better life. The book starts off with Valjean in a jail cell, and then he escapes. This is where he learns about the importance of honesty. Later on in the book Valjean becomes a father to Cosette he learns the importance of love and family. He realizes how much Cosette means to him and that he would do anything to protect her and give her a respectable life. Finally when Cosette marries Marius, Valjean has a complete family that loves him. As the book goes on Valjean realizes that stealing is not the way to get something, and he will never gain respect or love from anyone from doing so. Once he starts being honest good things start to happen. He finds a Cosette who is like a daughter to him and then realizes he should never commit another criminal act for the sake of his daughter. “Valjean comes to value his own existence more because the girl is dependent upon him and loves him” (Reeves 5). He was able to live a happy peaceful life once he was able to embrace his past and move forward and learn that what he did was wrong. In Les Miserables by Victor

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