Strategies For Reform Throughout Managed Health Care

1201 Words5 Pages
Aubrey Runnels
9/28/15
Summary Form #2
Group focus: Strategies for reform in managed health care
Reading Sections: Chapters 3&4 (M&W), Chapter 2 (C,C&C), Chapters 3, 4,&5 (J), and Ted Talks: Aaron Huey: America’s native prisoners of war

1. Summary of each assigned reading and video:

Ted Talks: In the Ted Talks video of Aaron Huey, Huey makes the point that the Lakota people are now suffering due to the damage that the U.S. has done over many years. This damage includes the following: The Wounded Knee Massacre, which was when the U.S. killed 300
“Prisoners of war”. When the Lakota people felt like prisoners on their own land when they were forced to live on the Pine Rich Reservation which is known as a war camp, most unemployed
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What has nature ever done for us?: Chapters 3,4,&5
Chapter 3:
Plants and animals are very important to human life. Plants and animals developed natural forms of protection against biological attacks. Unfortunately, when we modify plants some can’t fulfill their normal duties. We need to keep our plant and animal life as pure and natural as possible.
Chapter 4:
In this chapter the author stresses the importance of creatures that pollinate such as insects, birds, bats, and bees. Bees are the primary source of pollination for much of our plant life. Without bees we wouldn’t have plants and the dropping numbers of the bee population is negatively affecting our food production.
Chapter 5:
This chapter starts off talking about the drop of numbers of vultures in India. Most of which became extinct. This was due to a new anti-inflammatory drug that was given to sick animals.
Vultures eat dead carcasses which was a good thing for everyone. After the vultures fed on the bodies of other animals that had been given this drug they died. Without vultures, the bodies of the animals were buried or burned. Not to mention that the bodies of the dead animals sitting in the sun was a public health hazard. When the population of vultures disappeared, the population of feral dogs increased. This was a bad thing. This brought on multiple diseases with one of them being rabies. Noted in the chapter ( 47,395-48,886 additional deaths from rabies). Ultimately,
what
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