Summary Of ' The Kite Runner '

1036 Words5 Pages
Zachary Koons Locklear Advanced English II 30 September 2015 Shi’a Vs. Sunni Culture Imagine yourself in a world where the place you grew up in, was turned to dust, rubble, and heaps of it’s former self. Imagine yourself in that world for a second. The Kite Runner is a novel about two friends, inseparable by friendship and blood but divided by religion class. In the novel, “The Kite Runner” there is a young man named Amir, a Sunni Muslim, and Hassan, his servant and friend, a Shi’a Muslim. The two shouldn’t be friends by the standards, but all they know is friendship. Everything says that Shiite’s and Sunnis shouldn’t be friends. But the two boys find happiness in their relationship. This is all about the two divisions and how they are the same and how they’re different. The Sunni consider themselves the more orthodox and traditional group of the two divisions. The word Sunni comes from "Ahl al-Sunna", the people of the tradition. The tradition in this case refers to practices based on precedent or reports of the actions of the Prophet Muhammad and those close to him (BBC News). The Sunni division makes up roughly 80% of the Muslim population. The Sunni maintain that the Muslim community was to select the Prophet 's successor (caliph) to lead (Patheos.com). Sunni life is guided by four schools of legal thought—Hanafi, Maliki, Shafii, and Hanbali—each of which strives to develop practical applications of revelation and the Prophet 's example (BBC News). The Sunni have

More about Summary Of ' The Kite Runner '

Get Access