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The Ancient Egyptian Pyramids : The Seven Wonders Of The World

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The Egyptian Pyramids The seven wonders of the world: the Temple of Artemis at Ephesus, the Hanging Gardens of Babylon, the Lighthouse of Alexandria, the Statue of Zeus at Olympia, the Mausoleum at Halicarnassus, the Colossus of Rhodes, and of course, the Great Pyramids of Giza. (telegraph.co.uk) The Great Pyramids of Giza, built between 2584 and 2561 B.C, are located twelve miles from the capital of egypt, Cairo. (ancient.eu) They were the tallest man made structures in the world for 3800 years, until the completion of the Lincoln Cathedral in England. Measuring at 230 meters wide and 146 meters tall, the Great Pyramid at Giza took over 100,000 workers and over 20 years to complete. (Ancientegypt.co.uk) Why did the the Egyptians go…show more content…
(Biography.com)
The pyramids explain an abundance of information on about how the people of ancient egypt saw their pharaohs and queens. Inducing years and years of back-breaking labor to build structures that have people today still in awe. Historians still argue about who actually built the pyramids; due to the fact that they are so gigantic, some believe that the ancient egyptians could not have possibly built the pyramids by themselves based on the size of the pyramids and the lack of technology they were using. However, Mark Lehner, archeologist at the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago and Harvard Semitic Museum, thinks that the people of ancient egypt built the pyramids to show their respect to the pharaohs and queens who ruled over them. “Every time I go back to Giza my respect increases for those people and that society, that they could do it. You see, to me it 's even more fascinating that they did this. And that by doing this they contributed something to the human career and its overall development.” Mark Lehner 's statement shows that the ancient Egyptian culture admired their leaders more than any other culture did at the time. (pbs.org) The culture
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