The Civil War Of The United States

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One of the most difficult times in the history of the United States was the Civil War. The Civil War is often remembered as the war to end slavery. While that did play a part of the Civil War the larger issue at hand was the annihilation of the United States of America. The Confederate States of America wanted to break away from the United States and form their own country.
The Confederate States of America, or more commonly known as the Confederacy, was formed by seven slave states located in the southern region of the United States. The economy in the southern half of the United States was heavily dependent on agriculture. Running a farm takes a lot of manpower which is why the slave industry was such big business in the lower half of
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The states splintered during spring time of 1865.
A major consensus among white Southerners was they were more “southern” than they were Americans. Dating back to the early days of the formation of the United States a popular thought was that citizens had more pride in their respective states than the newly formed federal government. Another issue was that the states would not have as much power in light of a new federal government. For the next hundred years those issues would not perish in the South. Southern pride ran strong and Lincoln’s aim to end slavery was like an attack on their livelihood. The southern states saw themselves as an entity all their own and decided to secede from the Union, what the northern states came to be known as that represented the United States of America. That sense of regionalism in the South affectionately came to be known as the “Cause” among Southerners. Southerners saw Lincoln’s attempt to end slave labor as an attack on their lifestyle.
Seceding from the United States was something that was unheard of. The Confederates rationale was that there was no wording in the United States Constitution had no specific clause that forbade states from breaking apart from the country. They argued that it was a pact among the states instead of binding contract. Under the South’s new government their constitution, called the Articles of Confederation, outlined
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