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The Contributions Of Le Corbusier

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A Swiss-born France architect, Le Corbusier, belonged to the first generation of the so-called International school of architecture. His designs combine the functionalism with of the modern movement with a bold, sculptural expressionism; highly polemical designer hailed from obscurity in the Swiss Jura Mountains to become the most influential architect and urban planner of the twentieth century. His ideas about rationalized, immense, zoned and industrially-constructed cities, seduced, but also shocked a global audience, while they never come to fruition as a cohesive vision, his disciples put many of their pieces into place around the world during and after his life.
Charles Édouard-Jeanneret was born on October, 6, in 1887, in the small
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As was always to be the case with Le Corbusier, inbuilt projects, as soon as they were published, created as much stir as did the finished buildings.
In 1922, Le Corbusier formed a partnership with his cousin Pierre Jeanneret, which lasted until 1940. One of their first projects was a new studio for Ozenfant in Paris; it revealed Le Corbusier’s dedication to the new industrial aesthetic: using large expanses of glass set into reinforced concrete structure raised on point-support piers called pilotis, the roof employed a sawtooth configuration of skylights, like industrial buildings, as if to indicate that the studio was a factory for art.
The same year, at the Salon d’Automne Le Corbusier exhibited two projects that expressed his idea of social environment and contained the germ of all works of this period. The Citrohan House displays his conception of modern architecture. Pillars supporting the structure, thus freeing the ground beneath the building, a roof-terrace, transformable into a garden and an essential part of the house, an open floor plan: a façade free of ornamentation, and windows in strips that affirm the independence of the structural
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He aimed to show the radical transformation and structural liberties reinforced concrete and steel allow us to envisage in urban housing. Also, he aimed to demonstrate that the comfortable and elegant units of habitation could be agglomerated in long, lofty blocks of villa-flats. Le Corbusier’s insistence on the utility of his model, thereby exposing the crass commercialization of the rest of the fair, no doubt contributed to the exposition’s directors’ attempts to cordon off his pavilion behind a barrier until an injunction from the Ministry of Culture lifted
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