The Crucible Character Analysis

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In The Crucible, a play written by Arthur Miller, the characters have an innumerable amount of concerns for their own reputation. This is an immense theme represented throughout the entire play. The characters are too drawn into the sake of keeping the good of their name. In The Crucible, characters such as Reverend Parris, Abigail Williams, and Mary Warren are highly drawn to their reputations. This affects the way they act because it brings their actions into play. Their situations are similar because they all attempt to defend the sake of their name. The differences are the reasonings behind it. In the Puritan society, a good name is more important to them than the truth because their being becomes frowned upon by the community around…show more content…
He trembles at the thought of his ministry being taken away. Reverend Parris is angered by Abigail and Betty’s acts because it will destroy his good name and people will lose their respect for him. Another example of a character distressed by their reputation is Abigail Williams. Abigail’s life is defined by her reputation in the town, so she does not want to ruin her image. When Reverend Parris questions Abigail saying, “then you were conjuring spirits last night?” (Miller 4). Abigail becomes petrified and puts the blame on Tituba and Ruth so she would not be the one punished. In the same scene, Betty suddenly springs off the bed and says “you drank blood, Abby, you drank blood!” (Miller 4). Instantly, Abby forces her back into the bed and tells her to be quiet because she fears the townspeople will begin to talk of her doings. Another illustration would be when Mary Warren confesses to the court that the girls were lying of their accusations in the town, Abby denies it and says “I have naught to change, sir she lies” (Miller 40). Abigail knows Mary is telling the truth, but contradicts her statement to still have an acceptable standard. She then initiates her stunt and presumes to the governor, “I have been hurt, Mister Danforth; I have seen my blood runnin’ out!” (Miller 43). She continues her act and trembles, “I.. I know not. A wind, a cold wind has come” (Miller 43). Abigail pretends to have a sudden shiver

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