The Death Of The Epic Of Gilgamesh

889 WordsFeb 4, 20164 Pages
The idea of death is prominent in all cultures. Everyone who has ever lived has died; it is a fact of life and nature. Though death is a natural assurance people, still have an uneasy relationship with the idea. Many people question what happens after death and from this people fear the unknown qualities behind it. This leads them to search for a way to change the inevitability of death. The story of Gilgamesh is a classic example of how far people will go for their fear of death. The first half of Gilgamesh’s story does not exactly delve into the main theme of death but help sets up the situation that the latter half uses to expand upon. The story of Gilgamesh starts out explaining the might and power of this king. Proclaiming Gilgamesh’s demi- god status as a “perfect” being the gods created by imbuing him with mighty strength and powers. One would assume him to be above mortal limits being two parts god and one part man. Therein lies the problem, since one third of him is human, he is affected by the all-encompassing factor humankind faces, which is death. At first Gilgamesh knows he is not meant to live forever but his name will live on though the stories his people pass down. As a king, he is privileged to this certain life legacy. Gilgamesh is, at first, content with letting his name be remembered, far after he has passed on. This is a form of memorial immortality is one that few are able to achieve, he knows this and takes it in with honor. In order to make
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