The Different Cultures of U.K. and China

1886 Words8 Pages
Tea drinking cultures about U.K. and China
CHAN Gloria
Upper Iowa University (SOC240 – Diverse Cultures in America)
Dr. Alan Lai

Abstract
Every nation will have their different cultures, like the United States is a multi-cultural society, Japan and China is a democratic society trip. Every culture show different characteristics of their civic. And in this paper I would like to show you about the tea drinking cultures. Every single thing can show culture of their country. I working in a tea house and I would know about different people their different thinking about tea. I would like to do a compare in this paper.

Cultures of U.K.
Britain's official name is "United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland", often referred to
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Examinations and a culture of merit remain greatly valued in China today. In recent years, a number of New Confucians (not to be confused with Neo-Confucianism) have advocated that democratic ideals and human rights are quite compatible with traditional Confucian "Asian values". With the rise of European economic and military power beginning in the mid-19th century, non-Chinese systems of social and political organization gained adherents in China. Some of these would-be reformers totally rejected China's cultural legacy, while others sought to combine the strengths of Chinese and European cultures. In essence, the history of 20th-century China is one of experimentation with new systems of social, political, and economic organization that would allow for the reintegration of the nation in the wake of dynastic collapse.

Teas culture
Tea is the agricultural product of the leaves, leaf buds, and internodes of various cultivars and sub-varieties of the Camellia sinuses plant, processed and cured using various methods (Tea Guardian, 2010). "Tea" also refers to the aromatic beverage prepared from the cured leaves by combination with hot or boiling water, and is the common name for the Camellia sinuses plant itself. After water, tea is the most widely consumed beverage in the world. It has a cooling, slightly bitter, astringent flavor which many enjoy (Penelope Ody, 2000).
There are at least six varieties of tea: white, yellow,
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