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The Failure of the Schlieffen Plan and Its Effects on the German Defeat on the Western Front

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The Failure of the Schlieffen Plan and Its Effects on the German Defeat on the Western Front By the spring of 1914, imperial Germany was spoiling for war. Germany’s leaders were determined to break up the Triple Entente of Britain, France & Russia that had isolated Germany in Europe & thwarted its territorial ambitions. And when Arch-Duke Franz Ferdinand was assassinated on June 28 1914 it gave Kaiser Wilhelm the reason to declare war. In the diplomatic controversy growing out of the assassination, the Kaiser backed Austria-Hungary & totally opposed Russia. This started a series of political & military tactics that made a war inevitable. The constraints of The German ‘Master Plan’ for…show more content…
However, many long-term causes arose from the consequences of the Schlieffen plans failure. The German inability to control the high seas is a clear reason for her defeat. Neither the allies nor the Germans wanted a war at sea, as the winning navy would gain control of the trade routes & thus would basically end the war, as the losing side would be unable to bring resources in for their army or people. Though the Battle Of Jutland (31st May 1916) was a failure, for even though the British lost more vessels the Germans retreated back to harbour, not to leave for the rest of the war, with no real winner, both sides claimed an equally shared victory. The British navy were also hard at work organising an economic blockade to cut off Germany’s food supply by stopping neutral ships and confiscating cargo that could have been taken to Germany. The German reply to the blockade led to the turning point of the war, unable to battle the British on the sea they concentrated on conducting a successful U-Boat campaign to starve the British into submission, by sinking Merchant ships taking supplies to Britain. Yet again, Britain outmanoeuvred a strong German tactic by introducing the Convoy System, a plan devised to stop the sinking of merchant ships by U-Boats, by positioning 4-5 British Frigates
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