The Good Life Defined By Aristotle

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The good life defined by Aristotle in Nicomachean Ethics is a feasible goal that all humans should be able to aim for but restrictions make it impossible for all citizens of ancient Greece to achieve it which foreshadows the gender and racial stereotypes that can be seen in our culture today. Aristotle questions this claim by having an inner debate with himself in the process, he creates many theories, but he clarifies what he determines to be the good life by saying, ”Our present discussion does not aim, as our others do, at study; for the purpose of our examination is not to know what virtue is but to become good, since otherwise the inquiry would be of no benefit to us.”(1103b25 ff) It is a misconception that Eudaimonia means happiness…show more content…
Only 30% of the population could achieve eudaimonia. Factors that make one ineligible are based off of social class, gender, and luck at birth play a huge role in one 's availability to have a good life. Eudaimonia restricts about 70% of the population is Greece. This group is made up of mostly slaves and women. This restriction is biased because it is based of what one must do to be virtuous. The criteria are being hard working, spending time cultivating one 's morals, thriving in a specialized skill that comes naturally to them, and also being knowledgeable. Woman and slaves can never reach this because they either do not have access to education or they must drop out at a young age to begin work. By not having an education they have no way of becoming wise, which teaches skills need to have Eudaimonia like working hard, balancing their virtues, and it is a time to figure out what you are good at. The obstacles they face make it impossible to get an education which teaches them all these things. School also helps students become self aware, critical thinkers, and future leaders creating the ideology that upper class men are superior. A slave 's job is to listen and work for their master and a woman 's job is to stay at home and take care of the family. This inferior group of people also includes young men who are born into families that are not virtuous and do not have set morals. This is where luck comes into play. For example, two babies could be born in

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