The Impact of a Pandemic

799 Words Jan 28th, 2018 3 Pages
These pandemics, as horrific and deadly as they are, have brought so much more positive advances to our health care system and how we prepare for biological threats. Although we are in the twenty-first century and we have advanced so far in healthcare, there is still the possibility of a deadly pandemic. Many people may confuse Pandemic with Epidemic which can often times lead to being over prepared or under prepared. An epidemic as an infectious disease that quickly travels within a city, state, or country from person to person. An example of an epidemic would be SARS, which spread through many countries and killed roughly 800 people. On the other hand, Pandemics differ because the infectious disease is spread globally. A pandemic has a much higher infectious rate and an even larger death rate compared to an epidemic. The world has experienced a total of four pandemics in the twentieth century starting in 1918 until present. In 1918, the spanish flu caught worldwide attention when it infected close to half the population of the world, claiming more than 40 million lives. What made the spanish flu capable of infecting over a billion people was the ability to quickly transfer from person to person. At the time, world war 1 was happening and the mass activation and recruitment of troops to fight made the spread of the flu easy. The Asian flu of 1957 was second deadly pandemic to hit the…