The Inconsistancies of Life in In The Canterbury Tales and The Knight's Tale, by Geoffrey Chaucer

1707 Words Feb 2nd, 2018 7 Pages
When an individual's fortunes are up, other individuals are down. This issue is expressed by the pattern of the narrative, in which depictions of favorable luck are immediately followed by disasters, and characters are subject to memorable inversions of fortune. Geoffrey Chaucer is known for being a breath of fresh air in the realm of fourteenth century literature. He is witty and amusing, while handling determinedly serious subjects, such as assault or the defilement of religious figures. There is a double dose of narrating in his Canterbury Tales: both the pilgrims and the stories they tell, give amusement to the audience. The most significant part of Canterbury Tales is that, once translated into Modern English, today's readers can still relate. Triviality, desire, and insatiability, and the rest of the seven destructive sins, are fascinating and simple for individuals to handle at the same time. For instance, The Knight's Tale is a romance that embodies the motifs, themes, and beliefs of cultured affection: love is similar to a sickness that can change the lover's physical appearance, the dangers one encounters just to win support of his lady. The lovers are sleepless because they are tormented by their affection, and for a…

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