The International Criminal Court : A Paradox Of Coherent Decision Making Processes?

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The International Criminal Court: a Paradox of Coherent Decision Making Processes? Any scholar interested in international governance has probably heard about the International Criminal Court (ICC). The ICC, based in The Hague, is an international court specialised in investigating and prosecuting actors that have committed “the gravest crimes of concern to the international community” such as genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity. The ICC has 124 State Members, notably excluding the United States, Russia and China. Despite the ICC’s successful efforts in fighting impunity, the modus operandi of the Court is a true nightmare for anyone who cares about promoting efficient and coherent decision-making. A clear example of this, is the ICC’s yearly budget approval, which will be the main focus for this paper. As seen in Figure 1.0, the ICC’s Committee on Budget and Finance (CBF) designs a annual budget which then is passed to the Assembly of State Parties (ASP) for approval. It seems straightforward, but in the following paragraphs it will become clear that this sequence has alarming disadvantageous effects. The Court has created an astonishing complicated model which boosts the costs of carrying out any decision. In this paper, I will argue that the current decision-making mechanisms implemented in the ICC, have had serious adverse effects on the functioning of the Court as a whole. I will demonstrate, by applying the key notions presented in Shepsle’s and Munger

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