The Spanish And Spanish Cultures Of Spanish America

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Peninsulares, who were people born in Europe, were at the top if the social hierarchy, even though there were always more Indians than Europeans. The Spanish hoped the Indians would assimilate into their culture, and even gave them certain rights in the societies. Spanish rule was weaker in regions where Indians were not highly populated and there were not major Indian cities. In 1514, the Spanish government allowed intermixing marriages, since every single man needed to be married, and to convert the Indians to Christianity. Mixed people, mestizos, become a large part of the population in 1600, and eventually replaced the original inhabitants in the Valley of Mexico. Spanish America became a mixed culture of Spanish, Indian, and even African,. The Virgin of Guadalupe, the patron saint of Mexico who was seen by Juan Diego as a dark-skinned Indian, became a symbol of Indian and Spanish cultures mixing and was honored by millions.
Justifications for Conquest
The Europeans believed their culture to be superior to those of the New World, and expected them to abandon their beliefs, and those who didn’t were considered uncivilized heathens. Europeans were known to use violence and passion to conquer their enemies and spread benefits of their culture.
Spreading the Faith
The pope required Spain and Portugal to spread Catholicism to the Native Americans, and in the sixteenth century this was reinforced when the Protestant Reformation divided the Catholic Church. Spain agreed
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