The Univeral Language of Music

670 WordsJan 30, 20183 Pages
Music is often called the “universal language”. Different cultures all around the world use music as a means of expression. In Africa, music varies by region and typically reflects the values of the region. In most western nations, music expresses the values of the society as a whole. Throughout history, music has reflected the social changes, political ideology, and popular beliefs of the time. In the 1960s, many songs were influenced by opposition to the Vietnam War, and thus reflected anti-government ideology. Regardless of race, religion, and culture, music serves one primary purpose: bringing people together. Today, music is everywhere, in movies, on the radio, and even on our mobile devices. Everybody has their own preferences when it comes to music. Some people like rap and hip hop; others prefer country music. In many ways, the music we listen to represents who we are as a person. We often idolize certain artists because they share many of the same beliefs. Some people do not believe music has a significant impact on their life; for others, it defines who they are. At school, I see many kids with their headphones wrapped around their necks, blasting music so loud that I can hear it from across the classroom. For these kids, music is so important that they can’t even go an hour without it. But for me, listening to music is more of a leisurely activity and something I do in my spare time. Everybody has some passion for music, but very few people actually think it has

More about The Univeral Language of Music

Open Document