Theme Of Sita In The Thousand Faces Of Night

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Sita, Devi’s mother, in fact fitted the ideal description of womanhood. Sita, as her name signified was symbolic of an ideal wife, mother and daughter-in-law. She saw her femininity as an “illusion” and so she “seized it firmly by its roots and pulled it out of her soul till the enticing stems of the seven noted scale came, apart, broken and disharmonious in a cluster of pathetic twangs” (105). By giving up her veena she was giving up Saraswathi, to take on another goddess, the most ferocious of all, Kali. She meticulously planned the lives of her husband, her daughter and herself with clinical efficiency. She led her husband from promotion to promotion as he moved up the corporate ladder. When Devi was born she found a new ‘Veena’ to play on. She planned Devi’s education and sent her to America. She sent her husband, Mahadevan to Africa on a prestigious assignment. However the…show more content…
In response to the curious child’s queries about the conditions of the women around them, the grandmother usually narrated a story appropriate to the occasion instead of giving a direct reply. The parallels and the mythological equivalents had a profound impact on the mind of Devi. The story of Gandhari was narrated to Devi when she inquired about the veena in her mother’s photograph. When Sita, Devi’s mother came to the house of her in –laws, she had brought a veena with her and used to play on it when she found leisure. Her father-in-law once admonished her for neglecting her duties and questioned whether she was really a wife and a daughter-in-law. In the extended Hindu family, a bride’s position was primarily that of a daughter-in-law and not that of a wife. The in-laws and other family members viewed the nearly arrived bride with suspicion even as she grappeled with the new situation and tried hard to come to terms with herself in the changed
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