Theories Of Culture As A Worldview

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Sociologists have theorized culture and its role in the society in various ways. Some conceive culture as a worldview, where culture structurally orients individual actions and the ways in which they make sense of the social worlds. Others have theorized culture based on language and how it contributes to cultural processes of giving meanings to arbitrary signs to allow individuals to make sense of the world they live it. Still others approach culture as a practical toolkit, a cache of ideas, or repertoire, from which individuals draw in their day to day life. Several other conceptions of culture (i.e., culture as values, symbolic boundaries, or capital) are also available. This paper aims to investigate the three main conceptions…show more content…
Sewell concludes that structures contribute to production and reproduction of themselves, allowing cultural and structural changes to occur. Similarly, other scholars of culture use the concept of frame—how people act depends on how they cognitively perceive themselves, the world, or their surrounding—to capture how culture as a worldview allows individuals to make sense of how their social worlds operate. While schemas refer to already established set of rules and procedures that individuals could enact based on available resources, frames could be understood as a lens through which individuals observe and understand social life. Snow and Benford (1988) argue that the framing of a social movement organization (SMO) assigns meaning and help interpreting relevant events and conditions in order to garner support from the dominant group. They present several factors that allow SMOs to frame issues: 1) framing occurs from diagnosis/prognosis of a problem and rationale for engaging in corrective actions; 2) the framing of ideational elements must fit into the belief system; 3) the frames have to be empirically credible, experientially commensurable, and finally, fit within the existing cultural narratives. Thus, frames—like schemas—allow individuals and collectives to participate in meaning-making processes as
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