Transcendentalism Depicted in Henry David Thoreau's The Warmth of Other Suns

741 WordsJan 28, 20183 Pages
Transcendentalism was a trend during the romantic period where some authors chose to depict the serenity and the innocence that nature holds. Transcendentalists also believed that living totally dependent on oneself brings out the best in a person. Being a fairly independent person myself, I can identify with some of their opinions about life and nature. The idea of nature being a spiritual experience is a rebellious idea compared to the rationalism of many others during the same time period. The transcendentalist writer of the late 1700’s, author Henry David Thoreau, shares the same thoughts about nature, independence, and recreation as I do. The transcendentalists thought nature is something pure that can be fully appreciated if civilization is left behind. In Isabel Wilkerson’s, “The Warmth of Other Suns, written by Henry David Thoreau, looked at his short term lifestyle of simple living in natural surroundings with appreciation. Living in Perry County means you do not have to live with the hustle and bustle of big city living. Instead, we live everyday in a place with very little noise and interruption much like the outskirts of Thoreau's town. Although many of us may not care to admit it, Perry County is full of nature in its most pristine form. Someone like Thoreau would have loved to stay in a state park such as Fowlers Hollow due to its peacefulness and low number of visitors. Thoreau's main goal was to find a new level of understanding life with

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