Two Egyptian Sectors: Muslim Brotherhood versus Egyptian Army

991 Words 4 Pages
The recent revolutions in Egypt divided Egyptians’ into two sectors: The supporters of Muslim brotherhood, and the supporters of the Egyptian army “Anti-Muslim brotherhood group”. It created diversity in Egyptians’ social life (Fleishman & Hassan, 2013). To know why this problem started in Egypt we need to study both sectors, because a problem like that cannot exist over night. It is definitely an accumulation of long decades.
Hasan Al-Bana is the man who started the Muslim brotherhood group back in 1928. The Muslim brotherhood group is a religious and political organization (Muslim Brotherhood, 2013). Al-Banna defines the Islamic homeland as consisting of: 1.The country itself. 2. The other Islamic countries, for all of them are seen as
…show more content…
The recent revolutions in Egypt divided Egyptians’ into two sectors: The supporters of Muslim brotherhood, and the supporters of the Egyptian army “Anti-Muslim brotherhood group”. It created diversity in Egyptians’ social life (Fleishman & Hassan, 2013). To know why this problem started in Egypt we need to study both sectors, because a problem like that cannot exist over night. It is definitely an accumulation of long decades.
Hasan Al-Bana is the man who started the Muslim brotherhood group back in 1928. The Muslim brotherhood group is a religious and political organization (Muslim Brotherhood, 2013). Al-Banna defines the Islamic homeland as consisting of: 1.The country itself. 2. The other Islamic countries, for all of them are seen as a home nation for Muslims (Andrea, 2012). In my opinion, Al-Bana’s goal is to have an Islamic nation for all Muslims, which is really pure! Yet we live in a world that stopped conquests. As the Muslim brotherhood group expanded through years, the group was recognized by its rejection of western influences. Nowadays it has organizations in most Islamic countries (Muslim Brotherhood, 2013). The Muslim brotherhood group is known to target young adults for recruitment, usually in their first years in universities; they believe that the youth are the key power to leading the Islamic nation. Khalid Hamza the editor of the Muslim brotherhood English website, stated that “ we are an ideological grass roots group and we use our faith to pick
Open Document