Unilever's "Real Beauty" Campaign for Dove

1562 WordsJun 2, 20107 Pages
Abstract: This case is about Unilever 's "Campaign for Real Beauty" (CFRB) marketing campaign for its leading personal care brand 'Dove '. CFRB was a multi-faceted campaign that sought to challenge the stereotypes set by the beauty industry. This campaign featured regular women (non-models) who were beautiful in their own way and did not fit in with the idealized images of models, super-models, and celebrities. Unilever developed the CFRB campaign based on a global study on the perceptions and attitudes of women with regard to their personal beauty and well-being. This campaign was a huge success as it was appreciated by many consumers and resulted in increased sales of Dove products. It also generated plenty of buzz and wide media…show more content…
The ads for the Firming range in the US were the second phase of the CFRB. The ads sparked off a debate in the media. Ogilvy & Mather 's7 (O&M) marketing director Philippe Harousseau (Harousseau) said. "Some people are surprised, even shocked. ...We decided to bring this campaign to life because the survey told us women were ready for it."8 Though many people felt that these ads were a step in the right direction, there were others who felt that the campaign was contradictory in nature. On the one hand, the campaign was asking women to celebrate who they really were, and on the other, the ads were aimed at selling a range of products that would help women reduce their cellulite (or body fat)... Background Note As of 2005, Dove was the world 's largest cleansing brand with annual sales of 2.5 billion euros in more than 80 countries. Dove 's product portfolio included soap bars, body washes, face care products, antiperspirant/deodorants, hair care products, and styling aids... Dove Listens to Women In early 2004, Dove conducted a global study on the perceptions and attitudes of women with regard to their personal beauty and well-being. The study was done in partnership with StrategyOne and in collaboration with Nancy Etcoff (Etcoff) and the Massachusetts General Hospital /Harvard University Program in Aesthetics and Well Being, and Susie Orbach (Orbach) of the London School of
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