Use of Language in Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë Essay

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Use of Language in Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë Look closely at the passage in volume 1, chapter 7, where Mr Brocklehurst visits Lowood, from ‘One afternoon (I had been three weeks at Lowood)…’ to ‘… the inside was further beyond his interference than he imagined.’ Write an essay examining how language is used in this passage to convey and contrast the attitudes of Brocklehurst, Miss Temple, Jane and the other girls, and briefly relating this scene to the novel as a whole. This essay will examine the differences in language used by the first person narrator, Jane, Brocklehurst and Miss Temple in the aforementioned extract. How this extract relates to the rest of the novel and the themes introduced in this extract will also be…show more content…
In this extract Brocklehurst gives a long evangelical sermon explaining the reasons why the girls should learn to accept hardship for their own benefit. The syntax and language used are quite complex. The sentences are rather long and there are many references to the Bible such as ‘man shall not live by bread alone’ (Matthew 4:1-11). He is preaching and gets quite carried away. Mr Brocklehurst’s initial address to Miss Temple lacks any form of greeting. He immediately talks business and gives orders. He addresses Miss Temple politely at first as ‘Ma’am’ but when he has reason to reprimand her actions in some way he addresses her as ‘Madam’. At the sight of Helen Burns, Brocklehurst exclaims ‘What is that girl…?’ He does not see Helen as a human being just as an object that he wishes to control. The narrator also refers to Helen as ‘the awful object’, using a phrase which Brocklehurst would most likely have used. Brocklehurst does not actually address any of the girls directly in this extract. He gives his orders via Miss Temple: ‘Tell all the first form to rise up…’. By the end of Brocklehurst’s evangelical speech Miss Temple is gazing straight ahead of her, almost as though she has stopped listening to him. She does not respond either vocally or visibly; as though she does not feel his preaching deserves any kind of reply. The importance of integrity is demonstrated in this extract by Miss Temple
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