Wonderful Wizard of Oz as Allegory

2212 Words Mar 1st, 2009 9 Pages
Donovan Conner
Mrs. Collins
College Prep American Literature
February 9 2009 In Lyman Frank Baum’s, more commonly known as Frank L. Baum, novel The Wonderful wizard of Oz Baum describes a story in which a young girl Dorothy and her dog, Toto go on a magical journey from the dull, gray land of Kansas to the colorful, magical land of Oz. This girl and her dog meet three companions, a Cowardly Lion, a Brainless Scarecrow, and a Heartless Tin Man and have adventure in the Land of Oz and untimely help Dorothy get home. In Baum’s allegorical The Wonderful Wizard of Oz he uses satire and symbols, such as the regions of Oz, the characters of Oz and the Witches of Oz as to represent the Populist movement. Baum himself was fit to write a novel
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The Good Witch of the North, the first witch that Dorothy encounters, bestows a protective kiss upon her forehead but is unable to understand how the silver shoes that Dorothy got from the dead Wicked Witch of the East and was unable to free the munchkins from the East wrath. This is a symbol of the Midwest support for the Populism, because in the north had considerable support, but this support was no match for the eastern voter, just like the Good Witch was no match against the East Witch (Taylor 5). Dorothy learns that she is seen as a witch because she has a white checked shirt and white is seen as a sign of sorcery in Oz, this is also a of symbol of silver which was known as the “white metal” and free silver was a key point in the Populist party (Taylor 5). While the Witch of the North was the good Witch, The witch of the East was an evil one who had enslaved the munchkins until Dorothy’s house had landed on her and killed her. The Witch of the East’s death is a representation of the eastern financial and industrial interest and their gold-standard allies (Taylor 5). The Wall Street banker and the industrial leader were thought to be in some kind of conspiracy by the Midwestern farmer who blamed their woes on them (Taylor 5). They were thought to be out to “enslave” the “little people”, like how the East Witch had enslaved the munchkins (Taylor 5). This show how the munchkins are symbols of the Midwestern farmers who were “enslaved” by Wall Street
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