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Introductory Chemistry: A Foundati...

9th Edition
Steven S. Zumdahl + 1 other
ISBN: 9781337399425

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BuyFindarrow_forward

Introductory Chemistry: A Foundati...

9th Edition
Steven S. Zumdahl + 1 other
ISBN: 9781337399425
Textbook Problem
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ercise 10.2 Calculate the joules of energy required to heat 454 g of water from 5.4 °C to 98.6 °C.

Interpretation Introduction

Interpretation:

The energy in joules which is required to heat 454 g of water from 5.4 °C to 98.6 °C should be calculated.

Concept Introduction:

4.184 J of energy is needed to change the temperature of each gram of water by 1 °C and it is specific heat of water.

Thus, formula used for calculate energy in joules is E=mcΔT

Where, E = energy in joules

m = mass of water

c = specific heat capacity of water ( 4.184 Jg°C )

ΔT = change in temperature.

Explanation

It is known that it takes, 4.184 J of energy to change the temperature of each gram of water by 1 °C.

Therefore, multiply 4.184 J by the mass of water and temperature change.

ΔT (Temperature change) = 98.6°C5.4°C = 93.2 °C

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