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Chemistry & Chemical Reactivity

10th Edition
John C. Kotz + 3 others
ISBN: 9781337399074

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BuyFindarrow_forward

Chemistry & Chemical Reactivity

10th Edition
John C. Kotz + 3 others
ISBN: 9781337399074
Textbook Problem

When 108 g of water at a temperature of 22.5 °C is mixed with 65.1 g of water at an unknown temperature, the final temperature of the resulting mixture is 47.9 °C. What was the initial temperature of the second sample of water?

Interpretation Introduction

Interpretation:

Initial temperature for water mixed at two different temperatures has to be determined.

Concept Introduction:

Heat energy required to raise the temperature of 1g of substance by 1k.Energy gained or lost can be calculated using the below equation.

  q=C×m×ΔT

Where,

  q= energy gained or lost for a given mass of substance (m),

  C =specific heat capacity

  ΔT= change in temperature

Explanation

Given

At 22.50C  , mass =108g

Tfinal=47.90C

Assume the sum of qwater before mixing and qwater after mixing =0

Final temperature can be calculated as,

  [Cwater×Mwater(Tfinal-Tinitial)]+[Cwater

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