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    Jean-Jacques Rousseau

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    Topic #1 Jean-Jacques Rousseau makes the provocative claim that the transfer of sovereignty involves in the election of representatives signifies a loss of freedom: "The instant a people chooses representatives, it is no longer free." (On the Social Contract, p.103) Do you agree with Rousseau? The book "On the Social Contract" published on 1762 by Jean-Jacques Rousseau is one of his most important works, which points out the basis for a genuine political order and freedom. One of Jean-Jacques Rousseau

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    Jean Jacques Rousseau

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    Philosophy 4: Paper Two (Prompt #2) Rousseau believes that even when one votes in the minority they can obey the law and still be free. But, “how can the opposing minority be both free and subject to laws to which they have not consented?” (Rousseau, pg. 153) Rousseau’s response is that citizens must consent to all the laws because “ to inhabit the territory is to submit to the sovereign.”(Rousseau, p.153) In accordance with the social contract, when a citizen votes they should completely surrender

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    Jean-Jacques Rousseau "I was born to a family whose morals distinguished them from the people." (Josephson 9) Jean-Jacques Rousseau was born in Geneva, Switzerland on June 28, 1712. He became the son of Isaac Rousseau, a plebian class watchmaker, and Suzanne Bernard, the daughter of a minister who died shortly after giving birth to him. Rousseau's baptism ceremony was a traditional one held at St. Peter's Cathedral on July 4, 1712 by the reverend senebies. He had an elder brother who had

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    Jean-jacques Rousseau was a one of many things, he was a writer of the “Age of Enlightenment” and Rousseau was also a French philosopher. Rousseau’s political philosophy of formulation of social contract also known as Contractarianism, strongly influenced the French Revolution and also the development of the Liberal, Conservative, and Socialist theories. Jean-jacques Rousseau was born on June 28, 1712 he was born in the city-state of Geneva which was a protestant associate of the Swiss Confederacy

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    Jean-Jacques Rousseau      “I was born to a family whose morals distinguished them from the people.” (Josephson 9) Jean-Jacques Rousseau was born in Geneva, Switzerland on June 28, 1712. He became the son of Isaac Rousseau, a plebian class watchmaker, and Suzanne Bernard, the daughter of a minister who died shortly after giving birth to him. Rousseau’s baptism ceremony was a traditional one held at St. Peter’s Cathedral on July 4, 1712 by the reverend senebies. He had an elder brother who had

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    viewpoints on government due to basing their ideas on the same former structures. But, in contrast new government structures include a variety of variations. Therefore, Jean Domat, Montesquieu and Jean Jacques Rousseau have major differences in their outlooks on government, but they do share similar aspects. To start off with, Jean Domat was a French jurist who ideas stem from the kings practice of royal absolutism. In addition, Domat also established a large presence of the law of God within her

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    Jean – Jacques Rousseau was a very influential philosopher of the Enlightenment period. Not only did he contribute ideas and opinions to society, but he also produced several new theories. Although Jean - Jacques had to go through a rough childhood, a trying education phase, and difficult experiences, he made himself into a highly valued person of his time; Rousseau was so valued that he even ended up in our history books. His ideas of empirical learning, the people – good but society corrupt concept

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    those who pursued their personal interests rather than those of the common good, then they would be seen as selfish and face consequences. Rousseau believed that each person obtains a “natural repugnance to seeing any sentient being, especially our fellow man, perish or suffer,” (DeLue and Dale 190) and that this only changes due to pity and selfishness. Rousseau did not take kindly to those who were seen as selfish and following self interest. He stated that a society “can banish him [a person who

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    boundless.” Jean-Jacques Rousseau, a philosopher during the Enlightenment, wasn’t necessarily one of the “smartest” of all the philosophers during this time period, but this only made his excellent work he produced even more amazing. Rousseau didn’t have the best or most ideal life as a child. His mother passed away when he was young, and his father got into trouble with the government. Humiliated, Rousseau fled Geneva, by himself, and moved to France and become a Roman Catholic. Jean-Jacques Rousseau believed

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    Jean-Jacques Rousseau was one of the most influential thinkers during the Enlightenment in eighteenth century Europe. His first major philosophical work, A Discourse on the Sciences and Arts, was the winning response to an essay contest conducted by the Academy of Dijon in 1750. When Rousseau wrote this he made an argument about the progression of certain sciences. He explained that virtue and morality was brought by theses sciences. These works brought on extraordinary contention in France and were

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