The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky Essay

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  • Allusions In The Bride Comes To Yellow Sky

    1386 Words  | 6 Pages

    In Stephen Crane’s “The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky,” the classic western showdown comes to an anticlimatic end when the town marshal fails to produce a gun and the gunslinger walks away (not into a blazing sunset). With the disappointing showdown Crane illustrates the flat ending of the west when the town marshal’s bride comes unexpectedly to Yellow Sky. “The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky” demonstrates the complex dynamic of the West passing away as the East penetrates and fills the open desert plain

  • Analysis on the Bride Comes to Yellow Sky Essay

    623 Words  | 3 Pages

    Analysis of The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky Set on the Texas frontier, “The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky” is a short story in which the setting plays a major role in symbolizing the changes in western civilization, as the East flows into the old West. The theme of the story is that change is inevitable whether one likes it or not it is going to eventually happen. This story uses symbolism to put images in our minds of the old West and the new West as well as how the characters are portrayed throughout

  • Nasty Trick in Stephen Crane's The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky

    2352 Words  | 10 Pages

    Nasty Trick in Stephen Crane's The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky "The great Pullman was whirling onward with such dignity of motion that a glance from the window seemed simply to prove that the plains of Texas were pouring eastward" (91). Boom! We're on a train witnessing the liquid landscape of Texas. This fact is all Stephen Crane chooses to tell us. In fact, he doesn't even use the word "train" until the ninth paragraph when he is writing dialogue for the man who is the betrothed to the woman

  • Point Of View In Stephen Crane's The Bride Comes To Yellow Sky

    1040 Words  | 5 Pages

    The Bride Comes To Yellow Sky, Stephen Crane uses a variety of literary elements to tell a story about a newly married couple. Some of these elements include the often overlooked point of view. The point of view in which a story is told has a critical impact on how readers understand the story. Point of view is a literary device whose importance is often overlooked. The point of view in which a story is told in has a critical impact on how the story is comprehended. In The Bride Comes to Yellow

  • Inevitability of Change in Stephen Crane's The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky

    1056 Words  | 5 Pages

    Inevitability of Change in Stephen Crane's The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky Humans are creatures of habit. In his work "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky," Stephen Crane considers this apparent truism as well as its sometimes unfortunate consequences. In the story, Scratchy Wilson and Jack Potter face a dramatically changing society. Although their actions and emotions concerning the changes in their town differ, Scratchy and Potter are both very fearful of the inescapable easternizing influences

  • Essay about Stephen Crane's The Bride Comes To Yellow Sky

    1034 Words  | 5 Pages

    Stephen Crane's "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky" Stephen Crane's "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky," as well as his other Western stories, owe much to Mark Twain's approach to the West. According to Eric Solomon, "both authors…used humor to comment on the flaws of traditional fictional processes" (237). While employing parody of the Western literary tradition, Crane also uses realism to depict the influence of the East on the West. In "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky," Stephen Crane uses symbolism

  • William Faulkner 's Bride Comes From Yellow Sky

    1202 Words  | 5 Pages

    better for the story. Two authors that incorporate suspense into their stories are Stephen Crane (Bride Comes to Yellow Sky) and William Faulkner (A Rose for Emily). The suspense is included in both stories, by the stories point of view, organization and inevitable change. The points of view in which the stories are told, initiates the suspense which is incorporated into the reader. In Bride Comes to Yellow Sky, Crane added

  • The Many Meanings of Stephen Crane's The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky

    987 Words  | 4 Pages

    The Many Meanings of The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky Stephen Crane's "The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky" is a tale about a town sheriff, Jack Potter, who is returning home from a trip where he has married. Jack returns shamefully with his new wife of little worldly experience. The town of Yellow Sky knows Jack as the fearless Marshal who is never afraid to stare down the barrel of a gun. Jack's return to Yellow Sky happens to be at a time when the town drunk, Scratchy Wilson, is looking for

  • Character and Setting Analysis of Bride Comes to Yellow Sky Essay

    729 Words  | 3 Pages

    Character and Setting Analysis of Bride Comes to Yellow Sky Setting and characters go hand in hand in The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky. With Each new setting there is at least one new character development. A new setting in each part of the story makes for diverse settings and characters. From a train leaving San Antonio to around the corner in a small town in Texas, a drunken gunslinger to negro waiters, this story has it all. This story begins on a train specifically in a parlor car. This

  • Social Evolution In Stephen Crane's Bride Comes To Yellow Sky

    717 Words  | 3 Pages

    Man’s inherent inquisitiveness propels social evolution. Therefore social growth is inevitable. Set in Yellow Sky, Texas in the 1800s, Stephen Crane’s “Bride Comes To Yellow Sky” follows Texas Marshal Jack Potter who introduces his new wife to his hometown. The town’s drunk, Scratchy Wilson is the antagonist who symbolizes man's primitive nature while Mrs. Potter symbolizes modernization. Crane skillfully structures the plot by abruptly replacing the climax with the denouncement, contrasts Scratchy’s

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